1. photojojo:

    Jo Teeuwisse stumbled upon a treasure of 300 WWII photographs at a local flea market in France. After scanning the negatives, she decided to visit the places from various photos and attempt to photograph them from the same angle.

    With the help of Photoshop, she was able to digitally blend her the photos together! 

    Unseen WWII Photographs Blended With Modern Versions

    via Zeutch

  2. Twitter to introduce photo filters to compete with Instagram? →

    It looks as though the craze for digital photographs that look as though they were taken on film cameras may soon be coming to Twitter…

  3. I’m now working on mapping Flickr photographs by time as well as geo location.  Here, the fill is adjusted depending on the difference between the photograph’s time stamp and the current time.  The whiter the dot, the closer to the current time and photograph was taken.  The darker the dot the further from the current time the photograph was taken.

    I’m now working on mapping Flickr photographs by time as well as geo location.  Here, the fill is adjusted depending on the difference between the photograph’s time stamp and the current time.  The whiter the dot, the closer to the current time and photograph was taken.  The darker the dot the further from the current time the photograph was taken.

  4. Over the past twenty years, photography has undergone a dramatic transformation. Mechanical cameras and silver-based film have been replaced by electronic image sensors and microchips; instead of shuffling through piles of glossy prints, we stare at the glowing screens of laptops, tablets, and mobile phones; negative enlargers and chemical darkrooms have given way to personal computers and image-processing software. Digital cameras and applications such as Photoshop have create, look at, and think about photographs. Among the most profound cultural effects of these new technologies has been a heightened awareness of the malleability of the photographic image and a corresponding loss of faith in photography as an accurate, trustworthy means of representing the visual world. As viewers, we have become increasingly savvy, even habitually skeptical, about photography’s claims to truth.

    — Mia Fineman, curator of Faking It: Manipulated Photography before Photoshop at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

  5. This afternoon I’ve been combining Flickr with Twitter (the yellow dots represent Tweets).  For some reason the Twitter search isn’t returning nearly as many geo tags as I would have expected, not sure if it’s my code or the API that’s at fault.

  6. The Major project that this blog was made to document may be over but the university course continues into another year.  I think that for the purposes of assessment it might be best if I start documenting this year’s work on a separate blog, simply so the examiners can see what work has been done since the start of this year.  Having said that, the work will follow quite closely from what I’ve been documenting on this blog so it seems to make sense to keep it going.
Anyways, I’m still getting back into the swing of things here at uni.  I realise I haven’t put up any pictures of the final exhibition here, my apologies.  At the moment I’m still… assessing the project myself.  Trying to see what worked, what didn’t work, what perhaps might have been done differently.  I’m also looking forward to what I’m going to do next, in this respect there are a few vague ideas beginning to take shape but I’ll save them for another post.
In the meantime this is what I did this morning, not much I grant you but it felt good to get out of the theory books and do a little bit of practical coding.  It occured to me that although geo-location was a fairly major part of the last project, I never actually mapped any of the photographs to a map.  So here’s a map.
The search I used is not as detailed as in the previous project, as this is only a test.  Basically, I have used the FlickrJ library to search for geo-tagged photographs within London and then a Processing Library called Unfolding Maps to plot these locations on to a map of London.  I know this kind of visualisation has been done a thousand times before, not to mention done better, but I have no desire to make work that is mere visualisation.  If I decide to take this further, it will be as a small part of a larger project.

    The Major project that this blog was made to document may be over but the university course continues into another year.  I think that for the purposes of assessment it might be best if I start documenting this year’s work on a separate blog, simply so the examiners can see what work has been done since the start of this year.  Having said that, the work will follow quite closely from what I’ve been documenting on this blog so it seems to make sense to keep it going.

    Anyways, I’m still getting back into the swing of things here at uni.  I realise I haven’t put up any pictures of the final exhibition here, my apologies.  At the moment I’m still… assessing the project myself.  Trying to see what worked, what didn’t work, what perhaps might have been done differently.  I’m also looking forward to what I’m going to do next, in this respect there are a few vague ideas beginning to take shape but I’ll save them for another post.

    In the meantime this is what I did this morning, not much I grant you but it felt good to get out of the theory books and do a little bit of practical coding.  It occured to me that although geo-location was a fairly major part of the last project, I never actually mapped any of the photographs to a map.  So here’s a map.

    The search I used is not as detailed as in the previous project, as this is only a test.  Basically, I have used the FlickrJ library to search for geo-tagged photographs within London and then a Processing Library called Unfolding Maps to plot these locations on to a map of London.  I know this kind of visualisation has been done a thousand times before, not to mention done better, but I have no desire to make work that is mere visualisation.  If I decide to take this further, it will be as a small part of a larger project.

  7. We have all had the experience of misplacing a memory bearing object – a slip of paper, an annotated book, an agenda, relic or fetish, etc. We discover then that a part of ourselves (like our memory) is outside of us. This material memory, that Hegel named objective, is partial. But it constitutes the most precious part of human memory: therein, the totality of the works of spirit, in all guises and aspects, takes shape.

    — Bernard Stiegler

  8. (Source: iraffiruse)

  9. I consider myself fortunate that photography exists, because otherwise I’d be stuck in the tragedy or ephemeralness that can come with installation art.

    — Sandy Skoglund

  10. Pure brilliant white.

    I think I might need to re-think my plinth.  My setup for the show basically consists of two iMacs and two wall-mounted external monitors.  Also on the wall will be a selection of empty photo-frames of various sizes and colours.  I have a webcam which is connected to one of the iMacs and I was planning to put this along with the marker photographs on top of a plinth, basically constructed to a size to cover the iMacs but with enough height to make a kind of shelf.  Looking at it in the studio today though… I’m not sure.

    I think really before I can say for sure I need to actually see it in the space where it’s going to be installed.  At the moment though, I feel that the plinth looks like something of an afterthought, not really complementing well the rest of the installation.  Perhaps it would be better if I were to paint the whole wall an off white colour, but then I fear that might also look out of place when the rest of the room is white.  Or perhaps I could put a shelf of wood across the top of the plinth to make it look more like a shelf or table top.