1. Twitter to introduce photo filters to compete with Instagram? →

    It looks as though the craze for digital photographs that look as though they were taken on film cameras may soon be coming to Twitter…

  2. discoverynews:

As convenient as a field glass?! Sign me up!
howstuffworks:

explore-blog:

On this day in 1879, George Eastman received the patent for the first film-using Kodak camera.

The whole camera had to be turned in so that the film could be removed and processed, and it did not include a viewfinder. Y’all, we are spoiled.

    discoverynews:

    As convenient as a field glass?! Sign me up!

    howstuffworks:

    explore-blog:

    On this day in 1879, George Eastman received the patent for the first film-using Kodak camera.

    The whole camera had to be turned in so that the film could be removed and processed, and it did not include a viewfinder. Y’all, we are spoiled.

    (Source: explore-blog)

  3. explore-blog:

Amherst College archivists uncover a new daguerreotype of Emily Dickinson, only the third known photograph of the celebrated writer in existence. 
(↬ Page Turner)

    explore-blog:

    Amherst College archivists uncover a new daguerreotype of Emily Dickinson, only the third known photograph of the celebrated writer in existence. 

    ( Page Turner)

  4. lomographicsociety:

    ‘Bliss’ Possibly the Most Viewed Photo

    The default Windows XP wallpaper featuring a peaceful green meadow and serene blue sky is the most ubiquitous photo, according to the Morts Photography blog. With a “guesstimated” 1 billion views, the medium-format photo was shot by Charles O’Rear who claims it was not digitally enhanced in any way.

  5. Future heirlooms like family photos, home movies, and personal letters now exist only in digital form, and in many cases they are stored using popular services like Flickr, YouTube, and Gmail.

    — 

    from Amazon product description, Your Digital Afterlife by Evan Carroll and John Romano

    I’ve not read this particular book but it strikes me that more and more questions are being asked about what happens to our digital possessions after we’re gone.  As the article I previously re-blogged pointed out in the case of digital music and books we don’t actually own what’s on our iPods, we merely have a license to use it.

    I’ve not focused too much on this question as I don’t think it’s perhaps quite so relevant to photography, as the photographs remain the property of the person who took them not the website they’re stored on.  I know there are exceptions but I am speaking quite generally here.  But there’s still a very real possibility of all the content we own being lost also; really all it would take is for us not to leave our account details behind.

    See also: http://www.thedigitalbeyond.com/

  6. Who inherits your iTunes library? →

    wired:

    infoneer-pulse:

    Many of us will accumulate vast libraries of digital books and music over the course of our lifetimes. But when we die, our collections of words and music may expire with us.

    Someone who owned 10,000 hardcover books and the same number of vinyl records could bequeath them to descendants, but legal experts say passing on iTunes and Kindle libraries would be much more complicated.

    And one’s heirs stand to lose huge sums of money. “I find it hard to imagine a situation where a family would be OK with losing a collection of 10,000 books and songs,” says Evan Carroll, co-author of “Your Digital Afterlife.” “Legally dividing one account among several heirs would also be extremely difficult.”

    » via MarketWatch

    #futureproblems

  7. Printed Instagram - will it catch on?

    welovephoneography:

    Amazing news! The Instagram Socialmatic concept camera is going to become a reality!

    The camera will come with WiFi, Bluetooth, 16GB of storage, and an internal printer for instant prints. 

    Instagram Socialmatic Camera Coming Out in 2013! 

  8. I should perhaps be a little clearer - I wouldn’t myself use the word ‘very cool’ to describe this project.  I’m still not a huge fan of Instagram, I saw an advert the other day  for a mobile phone company that used ‘Instagram’ as a verb and it actually annoyed me a little bit; although I suppose it’s not really a great deal different than how we use Google as a verb so I’m not going to get too up in arms about it.
What I do like about this project though, is it’s another example of how some people would like to get more out of the photographs they take on their mobiles.  In effect this is a kind of networked digital photo frame that updates in real time, so you don’t even have to access Instagram with a mobile or computer to see the photographs being taken by your friends - everything is shared automatically.
wired:

nevver:

Instacube

A very cool Kickstarter project. Check it.

    I should perhaps be a little clearer - I wouldn’t myself use the word ‘very cool’ to describe this project.  I’m still not a huge fan of Instagram, I saw an advert the other day  for a mobile phone company that used ‘Instagram’ as a verb and it actually annoyed me a little bit; although I suppose it’s not really a great deal different than how we use Google as a verb so I’m not going to get too up in arms about it.

    What I do like about this project though, is it’s another example of how some people would like to get more out of the photographs they take on their mobiles.  In effect this is a kind of networked digital photo frame that updates in real time, so you don’t even have to access Instagram with a mobile or computer to see the photographs being taken by your friends - everything is shared automatically.

    wired:

    nevver:

    Instacube

    A very cool Kickstarter project. Check it.

  9. Most of us think of memory as a chamber of the mind, and assume that our capacity to remember is only as good as our brain. But according to some architectural theorists, our memories are products of our body’s experience of physical space. Or, to consolidate the theorem: Our memories are only as good as our buildings.

    — Sarah Rich on the architecture of memory for The Smithsonian. Also see why memory is not a recording device. (via explore-blog)

  10. […] even in this digital age, every single image is special, is precious, has meaning, tells a story. Every single image captures a moment in time – a wedding, a baby, a friend pulling a silly face, the cat catching a mouse. I’m never going to stop taking photographs; I’m never going to stop sharing them, and I hope you never stop doing so, either.

    — 

    Kate Bevan, Instagram is debasing real photography

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2012/jul/19/instagram-debasing-real-photography?CMP=twt_fd